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Tomatoes are here!

June 24, 2020

We hung the tomato sign last week – and had our first BLT of the year! A true sign that summer has begun. Our certified organic tomatoes are now available here at the farm, self-serve as usual. For larger orders, or any special inquiries, please feel free to call ahead: 269-6203, or email: eastwindfarm2009@gmail.com.

We hope to see you soon!

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Strawberry and Tomato Update

May 25, 2020

We’re starting to get calls about strawberries, so it seems like a good time to provide an update. As many of you know, we follow an unusual schedule here because we have limited field space. We plant strawberries, then harvest the next two years, and then cover crop to build the soil. This is a planting year – we have just tucked our brand new plants into the field (see below!). This means that we’ll have our next PYO harvest in June 2021. While you’re waiting, make sure to head out to other berry farms in the area to stock up on fruit!

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The new field, just planted.

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They may not look like much yet, but check out those new little leaves coming!

While we won’t have strawberries in 2020, we will have tomatoes. They are coming along nicely, and we expect to have the first ripe ones in mid-June. Stay tuned for info about how sales at the farm will work this year – but rest assured that we’ll have all the delicious tomatoes you need!

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May 23 – these beauties are sizing up nicely. 

May

May 6, 2020

These first few days of May have been chilly ones, and promise to continue that way. Shockingly, there is snow in the forecast for next weekend (yipes). But, the grass is greening. And when the grass turns green, the sheep get antsy. So, today was one of my favorite spring rituals: fence training day! The lambs need to learn about the electronet fence – so that I can bring them all over the property and give them succulent grass all summer long. And today was the day.

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Redbone is a little concerned about the fence, but nearly everyone else is paying no attenting – and is instead focusing on the beautiful, delicious, green grass.

With this over with, tomorrow afternoon they can graze in the orchard… I think they will enjoy it.

Spring!

April 12, 2020

In this odd time where almost everyone is home, it’s comforting to take part in the spring rituals. We just planted the tomatoes in the high tunnel and had their first flowers today – so, of course we are dreaming of the first ripe tomatoes in June.

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Such a bright spring green. Can you smell the tomato leaves?

Also, I’ve been playing around with a little project that will use yarn in two gradients of colors from lime-green to lavender and from forest green to deep purple. It’s been a fun project that I’ve been documenting along the way, so I will share here. (I realize as I type this that there were lots of steps I didn’t document: shearing, skirting the fleece, washing, carding, and dyeing. But picking up from there:

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1. First, the batts. Carded up on my drum carder, which helps me blend colors easily and smoothly.

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2. I spun the singles, and then I plied them to created two-ply yarns of each color.

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3. Each individual skein, washed and hung out to dry in the April sunshine!

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4. Lastly, each skein was separated into two – and all of the little balls of yarn are ready for the next step.

And the final projects – two sets of thrummed mittens, each in a fun color scheme:

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There wasn’t **quite** enough to make the second pair, but I think some gray thumbs and cuffs look cute. 

 

Lambies!

February 16, 2020

It has been a while since our last post. But the past couple of weeks have brought some news that’s worth posting about! The 2020 lambs have started arriving. Two adorable sets of twins so far, and more to come throughout the month of February!

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ZsaZsa’s babies: Cokie (L) and Redbone (R).

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Davy’s girls: Agnes (bottom) and Ginger (top). 

Tomatoes are here!

June 22, 2019

We have been away, visiting gardens and learning about greenhouses in France, which was wonderful. But home is even more so. It’s amazing how fast plants grow and the farm scenery changes in just one week. We’ve come back to many lovely things: peonies, clematis, new bean plants and are up and looking great, and red, ripe tomatoes.

It was a long wait since last fall, but they’re worth it. Delicious, sweet and juicy – we’re having tomato sandwiches for lunch. And maybe more for dinner.

We’re hanging the ‘tomatoes’ sign today; anytime it is up, tomatoes are available at the farm self-serve in the greenhouse.

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June update

June 13, 2019

Here we are in June. If you are interested in strawberries, please see our strawberry page. The short story: it’s a cover cropping/soil building year, and we won’t be open for picking this year! We’ll next have berries in 2020 (a long wait, but worth it). Those of you interested in tomatoes are in luck: the crop looks good, and they are ALMOST ready. I’ll post again when we’re open for business.

In other news, this is the time of year to take photos of the perennial gardens, and the time when every farm walk results in a glimpse of at least one new thing in bloom. And asparagus, at every meal.

After a trying spring with gardens that were very wet for a very long time, we were finally able to plant everything out into the gardens. While it’s hard not to be impatient, waiting for things to get growing, it’s also a time full of optimism for the gardening season. We’re especially hopeful for what looks like a very good sour cherry crop (we have two trees, which is enough for several pies … just perfect).

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Little cherries, or as I like to call them, future pies. 

Summer = delicious.

July 20, 2018

Summer is upon us. The heat waves of the last few weeks sort of sapped our energy, but there’s no denying that the crops are generally pretty happy with the heat. Coupled with some much-needed rain earlier this week, things are growing well.

We had a wonderful strawberry season. It was so nice to see friends and neighbors, and of course, to enjoy strawberries in every possible way. Now that the season is over, we will plant cover crops on that field next year, getting ready to re-plant the next year, and finally have berries again in two years. It will be a long wait. But on the upside, the sheep have been enjoying grazing in the berry field after the fruit are gone – for them, I think the fact that it was off limits for 3 years makes it all the more enticing.

And tomatoes. We’re swimming in delicious tomatoes. Come on by if you’re craving some homegrown ripe tomatoes. For me, the combination of tomatoes, basil, olive oil, balsamic vinegar and salt is perfection. One of our strawberry customers, originally from Italy, told us about a delicious concoction of tomato, tuna, olive oil, vinegar and salt – and we agree that it is wonderful. I love how we can learn new ways to savor and appreciate this quintessential taste of summer.

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Ready for a delivery to Philbricks Fresh Market in Portsmouth, and Golden Harvest in Kittery. Yum!

All tucked in, safe and sound.

June 15, 2018

Once the berries start to color up, the birds seem to know practically immediately. Cedar waxwings, turkeys, you name it. But it is very satisfying to tuck the berries in under their netting where they are protected. I like to imagine that they are under a cloak of invisibility, this sea of white netting that looks nothing like a berry field (we hope).

PYO organic strawberries are coming soon! Check out the strawberries page , or follow us on Facebook, for updates.

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The berry field, protected under rows of netting.

 

Spring is finally here!

May 14, 2018

I realize that I have been delinquent in posting here; a long winter came between my last post and this one. But finally, spring has arrived… and at this time of year, the farm changes from day to day as all the plants, in sequence, bloom and fade, set fruit, and grow.

The tomato tunnel is looking good, and super green. We still have our salad veggies growing in the middle – so we’re harvesting greens daily while we patiently wait for our cucumbers and tomatoes.

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Eric, bearing a fresh salad to go with dinner – surrounded by tomatoes and cucumbers.

 

One good thing about a long winter – plenty of time to stay indoors and do some spinning. I’ve been working on creating quite a bit of hand-dyed and handspun yarn. A couple of days ago, I finally decided to wash it all up and hang it out to dry, and I’m super happy with how they look when all together. Colors!

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Handspun yarn from our sheep – including undyed wool, a few synthetic dyes, and some experiments with cochineal and dahlia. Pretty!